Love You To Death: A Psychological Crime Thriller

What happens to a serial killer when he loses his memory? When the thrill of the kill loses its impact Carl resorts to drastic measures resulting in a catastrophic event. He attacks without a plan and it all goes horribly wrong. Now, with his memory a blank he tries to piece together some kind of normal life, latching on to the beautiful nurse, Susie, who attended him at What happens to a serial killer when he loses his memory? When the thrill of the kill loses its impact Carl resorts to drastic measures resulting in a catastrophic event. He attacks without a plan and it all goes horribly wrong. Now, with his memory a blank he tries to piece together some kind of normal life, latching on to the beautiful nurse, Susie, who attended him at the accident. Wanting to get closer to Susie, he is frustrated when she is drawn to Detective Ben Guyer who is investigating a series of grisly murders. As Susie and Ben begin their romance Carl’s life disintegrates as the two separate halves of him try to splice themselves back together. He no longer knows what is real or merely a manifestation of his nightmares. As they merge into one he becomes desperate to hold on to Susie, his only anchor to his sanity. The only problem is that he will likely love her to death. His nightmares terrify him. What terrifies him more is the feeling that they're real and that he really is carrying out terrible atrocities, and more importantly a part of him loves it. As Detective Guyer gets closer to finding the serial killer, Carl tries desperately to hold on to the man he wants to be. Will the monster within him win or will the man he wants to be save his soul? This book will take you to hell and back. Welcome to the mind of a killer. ...more

The Architecture of Madness: Insane Asylums in the United States

Elaborately conceived, grandly constructed insane asylums—ranging in appearance from classical temples to Gothic castles—were once a common sight looming on the outskirts of American towns and cities. Many of these buildings were razed long ago, and those that remain stand as grim reminders of an often cruel system. For much of the nineteenth century, however, these asylum Elaborately conceived, grandly constructed insane asylums—ranging in appearance from classical temples to Gothic castles—were once a common sight looming on the outskirts of American towns and cities. Many of these buildings were razed long ago, and those that remain stand as grim reminders of an often cruel system. For much of the nineteenth century, however, these asylums epitomized the widely held belief among doctors and social reformers that insanity was a curable disease and that environment—architecture in particular—was the most effective means of treatment. In The Architecture of Madness, Carla Yanni tells a compelling story of therapeutic design, from America’s earliest purpose—built institutions for the insane to the asylum construction frenzy in the second half of the century. At the center of Yanni’s inquiry is Dr. Thomas Kirkbride, a Pennsylvania-born Quaker, who in the 1840s devised a novel way to house the mentally diseased that emphasized segregation by severity of illness, ease of treatment and surveillance, and ventilation. After the Civil War, American architects designed Kirkbride-plan hospitals across the country. Before the end of the century, interest in the Kirkbride plan had begun to decline. Many of the asylums had deteriorated into human warehouses, strengthening arguments against the monolithic structures advocated by Kirkbride. At the same time, the medical profession began embracing a more neurological approach to mental disease that considered architecture as largely irrelevant to its treatment. Generously illustrated, The Architecture of Madness is a fresh and original look at the American medical establishment’s century-long preoccupation with therapeutic architecture as a way to cure social ills. Carla Yanni is associate professor of art history at Rutgers University and the author of Nature’s Museums: Victorian Science and the Architecture of Display. ...more

The Crucible

The original CliffsNotes study guides offer a look into critical elements and ideas within classic works of literature. The latest generation of titles in this series also feature glossaries and visual elements that complement the classic, familiar format."CliffsNotes on The Crucible" takes you into Arthur Miller's play about good and evil, self-identity and morality. Follo The original CliffsNotes study guides offer a look into critical elements and ideas within classic works of literature. The latest generation of titles in this series also feature glossaries and visual elements that complement the classic, familiar format."CliffsNotes on The Crucible" takes you into Arthur Miller's play about good and evil, self-identity and morality. Following the atmosphere and action of the Salem witch trials of the 1600s, this study guide looks into Puritan culture with critical commentaries about each act and scene. Other features that help you figure out this important work includeLife and background of the authorIntroduction to the playCharacter web and in-depth analyses of the major rolesSummaries and glossaries related to each actEssays that explore the author's narrative technique and the play's historical settingA review section that tests your knowledge and suggests essay topics and practice projectsA Resource Center for checking out details on books, publications, and Internet resources Classic literature or modern-day treasure -- you'll understand it all with expert information and insight from CliffsNotes study guides. ...more

Daily Life of the Etruscans

The Etruscans were the most important -- and remarkable -- of the peoples who inhabited early Italy. But when the Romans gained supremacy, the distinctive Etruscan culture gradually disappeared. This masterly re-creation of the lives of a now-forgotten people lifts the veil from every aspect of their civilization -- origins, language, religion, and art.

Angel: A Hole In The World (Angel (Angel Comics (Buffy Vampire Slayer))

IDW's series of adaptations of landmark Angel episodes continues with "A Hole in the World," one of the series' most heartbreaking episodes Adapting both "A Hole in the World" and "Shells," this five-issue mini-series tells the tragic tale of how Illyria came to fight alongside Angel, and at what terrible cost.

Running Wild (Wild #1-3)

Three stories of sensual erotic romance. Three werewolves who feed a wild hunger Donovan must bring the Pack Alpha home and nothing more. But when he catches the sexy scent of Lisa Delaney, he's hers, body and soul and ready to risk both on an erotic desire that will shatter all boundaries. Kelon intends to return to his pack after helping Donovan, but he never counted on Three stories of sensual erotic romance. Three werewolves who feed a wild hunger… Donovan must bring the Pack Alpha home and nothing more. But when he catches the sexy scent of Lisa Delaney, he's hers, body and soul and ready to risk both on an erotic desire that will shatter all boundaries. Kelon intends to return to his pack after helping Donovan, but he never counted on the voluptuous distraction of Robin Delaney. She's the one woman who can make him contemplate a choice no werewolf should have to make. Wyatt can't afford to be attracted to the practical, completely human Heather Delaney. But she isn't a woman a man ignores no matter what the cost. ...more

The Captive & The Fugitive (In Search of Lost Time, #5-6)

The Modern Library’s fifth volume of In Search of Lost Time contains both The Captive (1923) and The Fugitive (1925). In The Captive, Proust’s narrator describes living in his mother’s Paris apartment with his lover, Albertine, and subsequently falling out of love with her. In The Fugitive, the narrator loses Albertine forever. Rich with irony, The Captive and The Fugitive The Modern Library’s fifth volume of In Search of Lost Time contains both The Captive (1923) and The Fugitive (1925). In The Captive, Proust’s narrator describes living in his mother’s Paris apartment with his lover, Albertine, and subsequently falling out of love with her. In The Fugitive, the narrator loses Albertine forever. Rich with irony, The Captive and The Fugitive inspire meditations on desire, sexual love, music, and the art of introspection. For this authoritative English-language edition, D. J. Enright has revised the late Terence Kilmartin’s acclaimed reworking of C. K. Scott Moncrieff’s translation to take into account the new definitive French editions of Á la recherché du temps perdu (the final volume of these new editions was published by the Bibliothèque de la Pléiade in 1989). ...more